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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
Large-Scale Art Protest Outside OxyContin Maker Ends in Arrest
A 13-foot sculpture of a “heroin spoon” was placed in front of Purdue Pharma headquarters, an emblem of what critics say is its role in the opioid crisis.
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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
Can an Artist Shift the Gun Debate?
At the Guggenheim, Shaun Leonardo encouraged those on all sides of the gun control issue to find common ground with their opponents, by connecting physically.
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artforum.com

Jun 22 2018
500 WORDS: Viva Ruiz
Viva Ruiz talks about Thank God for Abortion
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The Guardian

Jun 22 2018
Grenfell inquiry sacks expert architectural witness

Architect title protected in UK and John Priestley was last registered in 2010

The public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower disaster has sacked its expert architectural witness after it emerged he was not a registered architect.

Related: Grenfell inquiry: fire brigade report shows blaze's rapid progress

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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
Lens: The Transformative Nature of the Photographs of Diane Arbus
Diane Arbus’s portfolio “A Box of Ten Photographs” was pivotal in the acceptance of photography by the art world. A book published by Aperture and the Smithsonian American Art Museum examines the portfolio and its impact.
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The Guardian

Jun 22 2018
Lee Miller and Viviane Sassen review – photography and the female gaze

The Hepworth Wakefield
The contrast between Miller’s monochromes and Sassen’s colourful scenes belies the surreal energy their work shares

At the entrance to the Hepworth Wakefield’s new exhibition Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain sits Man Ray’s Object of Destruction, a ticking metronome with an image of Miller’s eye affixed to the pendulum. Ray designed the piece in 1932 after his relationship with Miller broke down (this is a reconstruction by Andrew Lanyon). Ray’s disturbing instructions – “Cut out the eye from a photograph of one who has been loved but is seen no more ... with a hammer well-aimed, try to destroy the whole at a single blow” demonstrate the force of her influence on his life.

Deconstructed women are a familiar surrealist trope, and Miller’s eye appears again more than 10 years later in Roland Penrose’s Surrealist Composition – this time engulfing her face. At this point it would be easy to plonk Miller in the category of muse, where the men who love her obsess over her best features and then throw hammers at them. But that would ignore the fact that Miller’s eyes give her agency as a photographer. Ray and Penrose admire her creative sight, so much so it becomes the essence of who she is.

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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
Reporter’s Notebook: A City at the Crossroads Examines Migration, Through Art
Italy’s new government is making strong gestures to deter migrants. But Manifesta, a major international art exhibition in the capital of Sicily, takes a more open view.
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The Guardian

Jun 22 2018
Alison Wilding review – pure sculpture from an artist whose time has come

De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea
This English sculptor is an alchemist, transforming primeval natural forms into dreamlike abstractions full of romance and mystery

Red Skies, which Alison Wilding created in 1992, is a hollow metal column split down its centre to let you peer inside. Within its dark interior floats a brass globe covered in enigmatic bumps and markings, like a magician’s occult signs. Around that hangs a red acrylic sleeve that transfigures the world framed by the narrow opening. Right now, installed in a long white gallery with a glass wall facing Bexhill beach, it frames the blue sea and sky. When you look through it they are set on fire.

Wilding is an alchemist whose art is full of romance and mystery and sudden transformations. She is also, her mini-retrospective at the De La Warr Pavilion makes plain, an artist of nature. Her abstract forms may not at first glance appear to have any connection with the natural world. A black fibreglass balloon nestling inside a ring of galvanised steel? Then you see the title: Cuckoo I. The menace begins to make sense. This bulging black cuckoo’s egg promises death. It contains a murderous embryo. Jagged, tooth-like cuts in the metal “nest” add to the sense of impending violence.

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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
In an East Boston Shipyard, a Fresh Idea for Art
As museums groan under costly expansions, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, found a modest alternative a ferry ride across the harbor.
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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Oprah Earned This Museum Show. And It’s a Potent Spectacle.
An exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture captures what Oprah Winfrey and her TV show have meant.
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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
How Tastes Have Changed: ‘Imps and Mods’ Stutter at London Auctions
Standout lots were few and far between at sales of Impressionist and modern works that finished 22 percent down compared with last year.
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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
This Week: Florence and the Machine, ‘Luke Cage,’ Central Park Concerts
Florence Welch soars on her band’s new album, the Marvel series returns to Netflix and the classics come back to Naumburg Bandshell.
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The Guardian

Jun 22 2018
Wall-to-wall Michael Jackson and the potent thrill of the 1930s – the week in art

Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons and more throw a 60th birthday splash for the king of pop, while Glenn Brown pays a fantastical tribute to the old masters – all in your weekly dispatch

Michael Jackson: On the Wall
Artists from Andy Warhol to Jeff Koons have taken inspiration from the king of pop.
National Portrait Gallery, London, 28 June until 21 October.

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The New York Times

Jun 22 2018
It Was an Ad? So What. It’s Still Art.
Despite the prominence of photography and fashion in the cultural conversation, they remain marginalized in some museums. The Getty hopes to change that.
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artforum.com

Jun 21 2018
PASSAGES: Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh Building (1909–2018)
Ray McKenzie on Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh Building (1909–2018)
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The New York Times

Jun 21 2018
24 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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artforum.com

Jun 21 2018
DIARY: Anti-Bodies
Elvia Wilk around the 49th Art Basel
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The New York Times

Jun 21 2018
Art Review: This Artist Foresaw Our Digital Future in a Meadow of Dandelions
At the New Museum, Thomas Bayrle’s world of units, patterns, machines and pixelation merging with nature takes shape in a career-spanning survey.
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The New York Times

Jun 21 2018
5 Ways to Celebrate Pride Away From the Mainstream
NYC Pride can easily overwhelm even the most extroverted people. Here are five ways to take part away from the crowds.
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artforum.com

Jun 21 2018
FILM: Girl Power
Amy Taubin on the 10th BAMcinemaFest
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The Guardian

Jun 21 2018
Leonardo's earliest surviving work? Self-portrait as Archangel Gabriel unveiled

Experts’ claim that small tile with profile image is by artist at 18 is already disputed

A small square tile with the profile image of a beautiful angel has been claimed not only as the earliest surviving work by Leonardo da Vinci, but as his own self-portrait as the Archangel Gabriel.

If genuine the tile has survived miraculously unbroken for more than 500 years, since the 18-year-old artist made it in 1471.

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The New York Times

Jun 21 2018
Overlooked No More: Amrita Sher-Gil, a Pioneer of Indian Art
With her paintbrush, Sher-Gil explored the sadness felt by people, especially women, in 1930s India, giving voice and validity to their experiences.
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The Guardian

Jun 21 2018
Framed in mystery: painting tells story of doomed Norfolk family

Years of research uncover lost 17th-century treasures and the song of a pale little girl

In the 1660s the Paston family of Norfolk commissioned a Flemish artist to record the treasure they had heaped up in their mansion – a glittering hoard including a globe showing their travels and the far-flung sources of their porcelain and crystal, as well as precious shells and ostrich eggs fashioned into goblets of gold and silver.

After years of research, the painting is going on display again in Norwich with as many of their treasures as could be traced and borrowed back, but the research – which included identifying and recording for the first time the sheet music being held by the pale little girl in the picture – has also revealed how the painting foretold the downfall of one of the wealthiest families in England.

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The Guardian

Jun 21 2018
Hidden portraits: rare photos of African American life get a spotlight

At a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art studio portraits of anonymous black Americans give a rarely seen view of life at a time of change

In 1861, African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass took the stage at Boston’s Tremont Temple Baptist church and declared: “To the eye and spirit, pictures are just what poetry and music are to the ear and heart.”

It was part of his speech Pictures and Progress, one of the most historic lectures on contemporary photography where Douglass talked about how photography could be a powerful force of positive self-representation to overcome racism..

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The Guardian

Jun 21 2018
Corita Kent’s That They May Have Life: banal slogans turned into spiritual silkscreen

The Catholic sister and art teacher was influenced by Warhol but flourished with her own spiritual and political screenprints

“Enriched bread” is a phrase culled from a wrapper for Wonder Bread, and at first glance this silkscreen seems of a piece with other pop art of the 1960s. Like the Warhol soup cans that inspired Kent, it replicates the bold graphics and catchy language of advertising.

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The Guardian

Jun 20 2018
Spite buildings: when human grudges get architectural – in pictures

Feuding brothers, thwarted lovers, and a lot of spoiled views: ‘spite buildings’ are our smallest human pettiness made manifest in bricks and mortar. Here are some of the best/worst

“Spite buildings” are constructions specifically intended to irritate or protest: our smallest human pettiness made manifest in bricks, mortar and a reckless disregard for planning laws. Their origins are often disputed, occasionally embellished and usually entertaining, revealing tales of spurned lovers, fraternal feuds and vengeance. Below we highlight a few of the most famous of these “malicious erections” (sorry).

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The Guardian

Jun 20 2018
Spirit of the North: a celebration of English heritage – in pictures

Historic England has commissioned the photographer John Kippin to create a series of images that capture the region’s multifaceted identity and cultural significance. The Spirit of the North collection, which features landmarks such as the Albert Dock in Liverpool and Durham Cathedral, will be exhibited at Bessie Surtees House in Newcastle from 22 June

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The Guardian

Jun 20 2018
Planet of the dispossessed – in pictures

Vanessa Winship has travelled the world exploring rifts, erasures and people at the edges. The winner of the prestigious Henri Cartier-Bresson award is now the subject of a new show at London’s Barbican

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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
in
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The New York Times

Jun 20 2018
Art Review: They Suffered for Their Cézanne Portraits
In the National Gallery of Art’s major survey of Cézanne’s stirring, troubling portraits, he treats family and friends with affectionate digs.
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
MANUTENZIONE
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
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EosArte.eu

Jun 20 2018
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