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The New York Times

Feb 21 2018
A Jeweled 19th-Century Doll Sets a Record and Heads for a New Museum
The French doll, with a necklace of gems containing tiny photographs, brought $333,500 at auction in January. It will be in the collection of the Barry Art Museum.
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The New York Times

Feb 21 2018
In Studio: Inside a Parisian Sculptor’s World of Wonders
Behind an old door on a quiet street, Philippe Anthonioz creates his larger-than-life pieces.
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The New York Times

Feb 21 2018
After a Blowup Kara Walker Lets Off Steam in New Orleans
Delayed by a dispute between Ms. Walker and organizers, her calliope installation finally opens to the public at Prospect New Orleans.
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The Guardian

Feb 21 2018
My best photograph: Mars rover Curiosity's shot of the hill she'll never climb

‘The mountain in the distance is her goal but we don’t think she’ll get to the top. It’s going to take her another five years just to get to the bright rock formation below’

Planetary scientist, US Geological Survey

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artforum.com

Feb 21 2018
FILM: Meta Man
Howard Hampton on Mike Hodges’s Pulp (1972)
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The Guardian

Feb 21 2018
Portraits by Bacon and Freud of same man go on display together

Strikingly different paintings of Bacon’s lover George Dyer hung side by side for first time

Two portraits by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud of the same man, one intense, twisted and distorted; the other serene, relaxed and unguarded, have gone on display side by side for the first time.

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The New York Times

Feb 21 2018
Show Us Your Wall: They Built a Home, and With It, a Collection
Susanne and Bill Pritchard discovered their passion for art when they commissioned a design for their dream home in Houston.
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The Guardian

Feb 21 2018
Tania Bruguera wins Tate Modern Turbine Hall commission

Cuban performance artist known for politically charged work to undertake next show

An artist who has used mounted police officers to corral gallery visitors and, on another occasion, required museum-goers to pass an immigration lie detector test, is to be Tate Modern’s next commission for the Turbine Hall.

The Hyundai commission, formerly the Unilever commission, is one of the most prestigious in contemporary art. It is also one of the most daunting, given the size of the space and its profile.

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The Guardian

Feb 21 2018
Post-Soviet Visions exhibition - in pictures

Post-Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe is a photography show exploring new visual representations of lifestyle and landscape in eastern Europe. The exhibition gathers the work of a young generation of artists rising to prominence a quarter-century after the end of Communism. It opens on 23 February at Calvert 22 space in London

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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
Roads to nowhere: how infrastructure built on American inequality

From highways carved through thriving ‘ghettoes’ to walls segregating black and white areas, US city development has a long and divisive history

It’s a little after 3pm in Detroit’s 8 Mile neighbourhood, and the cicadas are buzzing loudly in the trees. Children weave down the pavements on bicycles, while a pickup basketball game gets under way in a nearby park. The sky is a deep blue with only a hint of an approaching thunderstorm – in other words, a muggy, typical summer Sunday in Michigan’s largest city.

“8 Mile”, as the locals call it, is far from the much-touted economic “renaissance” taking place in Detroit’s centre. Tax delinquency and debt are still major issues, as they are in most places in the city. Crime and blight exist side by side with carefully trimmed hedgerows and mowed lawns, a patchwork that changes from block to block. In many ways it resembles every other blighted neighbourhood in the city – but with one significant difference. Hidden behind the oak-lined streets is an insidious piece of history that most Detroiters, let alone Americans, don’t even know exists: a half mile-long, 5ft tall concrete barrier that locals simply call “the wall”.

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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
The dark side of Los Angeles: crime and corruption in Tinseltown - in pictures

In a new book, a stark omnibus of photographs reveal the underbelly of Los Angeles from the 20s and 50s, showcasing corruption within the police force and the headline crime of the Black Dahlia

Dark City: The Real Los Angeles Noir by Jim Heimann published by TASCHEN

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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
Can chickpeas prolong orgasm? Yes – but only in LiarTown

It’s the satirical powerhouse for the fake news era. LiarTown’s creator Sean Tejaratchi tells us how he dreamt up cooking with tears, angry cow stamps – and that old Smiths classic Lovely Gary

Rodward Manshawl’s crosswords are not easy. Here’s 47 down: “Cockney rhyming slang for excessive banking fees” (six letters). Now try 46 across: “Carbonated urine” (four letters). What can the answers be? We will never know. Why? Because the clues were made up by graphic designer and ex-photo-retoucher Sean Tejaratchi, a satirist who was included in Rolling Stone’s 25 funniest people on Twitter in 2012.

Tejaratchi spoofed the New York Times crossword and, as a final touch, came up with a daft compiler name. Like everything else in Tejaratchi’s world, Rodward Manshawl is fake, but not so fake that he lacks verisimilitude. “What I try to do,” Tejaratchi says, “is create a zone of plausibility.”

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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
A Rammellzee Exhibition Is Coming to New York
The hip-hop pioneer will receive a retrospective featuring graffiti and sculptures at Red Bull Arts New York.
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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
LaToya Ruby Frazier’s commanding series on Flint, Mich.; Kristin Walsh’s intricate aluminum machines; and Huguette Caland’s richly colored caftans.
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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
In Picasso’s Blue Period, Scanners Find Secrets He Painted Over
Scientists used a variety of tools originally developed for medicine, manufacturing and geology to discover hidden details in the artist’s paintings and sculptures.
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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
The Scion of a Pakistani Political Dynasty Comes Out
The artist Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, grandson and namesake of the founder of the Pakistan Peoples Party, is queer, Muslim and proud.
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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
Popping into Picasso's: stranger's holiday snaps of artist on show

Images taken in France 64 years ago by an amateur photographer revealed by Lightbox Gallery

For half a lifetime after Stanley Stanley met a jolly, heavily tanned, bald man on the beach at Antibes, the prints and hand-painted plate he brought back as a souvenir of their time in southern France were stored away under his socks in a chest of drawers.

This spring, that evidence of the encounter between Stanley, an amateur photographer, and the bald man – Pablo Picasso – will be seen for the first time in a public exhibition.

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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
The Obama Portraits Drew a Strong Reaction. What Did They Mean to You?
Judging from the reaction, the official portraits of former President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama were anything but bland. Tell us what you thought of them.
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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
See change: the battle against sexual harassment in the art world

As women in the art world rise up against abuse from collectors and others, will the culture that’s protected predators shift?

When the American artist Betty Tompkins was a senior at Syracuse University in 1966, one of her painting professors asked her what she was going to do after she finished school.

“I’m going to move to New York and be an artist,” Tompkins, now 72, told him.

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The New York Times

Feb 20 2018
People, places and things: A Cultural Compendium of What’s New
A hotel that moves with the seasons, logo tees on the runway — and more.
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artforum.com

Feb 20 2018
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artforum.com

Feb 20 2018
NEWS: Judy Blame (1960–2018)
Vogue UK & Another Man
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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
Do you know an artisan working in the UK? Share your stories

We’d like you to help us document the work of artisans working across the UK, as part of our new series

From modern silversmiths to bicycle frame builders and a woman keeping Viking fishing traditions alive, Guardian photographer Christopher Thomond has been meeting some of the most creative artisans in the country.

The Artisans is a series showcasing artists and craftspeople in their working environments – from the traditional to the cutting edge, the mainstream to the unexpected – and we’d like your help discovering more people doing interesting work.

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The Guardian

Feb 20 2018
A London craft beer brewer – in pictures

Jaega Wise is head brewer at Wild Card Brewery in Walthamstow, east London, where she produces several of the core range of beers as well as the odd special brew.

The Artisans is a series showcasing artists and craftspeople in their working environments – from the traditional to the cutting edge, the mainstream to the unexpected – and we’d like your help discovering more people doing interesting work.

If you know of an artisan making something in an interesting way who might have a story we can tell through photography, share information you have about them here and we will do the rest

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The Guardian

Feb 19 2018
Paula Rego: 'Germaine Greer scared me and the President of Portugal nearly killed me'

Dolls, maids, nudes, presidents, grandchildren and a vindictive teacher she took revenge on … the great artist reveals the power – and the pain – of life-drawing

When I was nine I did a drawing of my grandmother. It was my first life drawing. She was sitting there sewing – she didn’t know I was drawing her. It looked like her. She always used to have chicks in her pockets and sometimes baby rabbits. It kept them warm. She liked them. She took them out for a walk sometimes.

When I was a little older, I’d draw my cousin, Manuela – sitting, standing, or in her knickers. She’s younger than me so I could boss her around. And I drew the maids. They stood still for me. I always made a noise when I drew, a moaning, groaning sound I wasn’t aware of. My mother knew I was happy drawing when she walked past my room and heard me.

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The New York Times

Feb 19 2018
American Is Charged With Stealing Terra-Cotta Warrior’s Thumb
Michael Rohana was attending an event at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia when he entered a closed exhibition room and vandalized the 2,000-year-old statue, the authorities say.
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The New York Times

Feb 19 2018
The Story Behind the Mesmeric, Moving Light Installation at Burberry
Christopher Bailey imported an epic artwork from Tasmania for his final Burberry show in London.
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2018
500 WORDS: Jayne County
Jayne County talks about her retrospective at Participant Inc. in New York
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2018
DIARY: Fair and Unfair
Marcela Quiroz on Mexico City’s recent art fairs and events
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2018
FILM: Mixed Messages
Travis Jeppesen on the 47th International Film Festival Rotterdam
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The Guardian

Feb 19 2018
After Darkness: Mosul emerges from Isis control – in pictures

After a nine-month battle, Islamic State was finally expelled from Mosul, leaving devastation and residents physically and psychologically scarred by the war. Abbie Trayler-Smith’s new exhibition records the devastating effects of life under Isis control in northern Iraq and the bewildering aftermath of conflict

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The Guardian

Feb 19 2018
The Lemon festival in Menton – in pictures

Since its start in 1933 as a fruit show, the festival on the French Riviera has grown into an internationally renowned event, drawing about 160,000 visitors to a joyful fruity gathering every year

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The New York Times

Feb 18 2018
Still Making Art, and Sly Jokes, at Age 91
Geta Bratescu spent most of her career in obscurity in Communist Romania. Late in life she came to international recognition, and now has a major show in Los Angeles.
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The Guardian

Feb 18 2018
Building and Dwelling by Richard Sennett review – sharp insights
With more than half the global population living in cities, the author’s observations on urban planning and street life are timely and engaging

There is a thriving line of business, in publishing, architecture and academe, in talking about something called “the city”. It entails thick tomes, conferences in interesting locations, meetings with mayors and power-brokers, events posing as public debates that are in reality diplomatic rituals. This industry draws strength and publicity from the facts that more than half the world’s population now live in cities and that the proportion seems set only to increase.

These same facts also dissipate and confuse. If so much of humanity lives in cities, then to talk of them is to describe, almost, the whole world. “The city” becomes a term so extensive and multiple as to be meaningless or useless. What, for example, might a prosperous, static, historic city in northern Europe have in common with an exploding megalopolis in south-east Asia? Often, studies of “the city” collapse into awe at its endless, sprawling, incomprehensible vastness, to the point where these epithets – endless, sprawling and incomprehensible – apply as much to the academic and publishing endeavours themselves as to the subject they are supposed to address.

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The New York Times

Feb 18 2018
In Search of Lost Time in Europe’s Sanatoriums
The facilities created a culture of escapism that persisted even as the world around them changed forever.
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